Histcon.se Time, Memory and Representation Tid, Minne, Representation

A Multidisciplinary Program on Transformations in Historical Consciousness

Ett mångdisciplinärt forskningsprogram om historiemedvetandets förvandlingar

Jens Bartelson

Professor of Political Science, Lund University

Biography

Jens Bartelson received his doctorate from the University of Stockholm in 1993, and was a fellow at SCAS in 1997. His fields of interest include international political theory, the history of political thought, political philosophy and social theory. Jens Bartelson has written mainly about the concept of the sovereign state and the philosophy of world community. He is the author of Visions of World Community (Cambridge University Press, 2009), The Critique of the State (Cambridge University Press, 2001), A Genealogy of Sovereignty (Cambridge University Press, 1995), as well as of articles in journals such as International Studies Quarterly, Political Theory, Review of International Studies, European Journal of International Relations, European Journal of International Law, and International Sociology.

Ongoing research

Ways of Warmaking

For most of the modern period, war has been understood in essentialist terms, as a timeless category of thought and action. Yet arguably, the concept of war has undergone a series of significant changes from the sixteenth century to the present, and many of these changes have had a profound impact on the sociopolitical world. Hence, in this project, I will explore how changing conceptualizations of war have conditioned the ways in which war has been conducted from the early modern period to the present. As I shall suggest, making historical sense of this connection is necessary in order to understand how practices of warfare have shaped the identities of agents and the boundaries separating them. Doing this, I shall focus on how different conceptions of war have been integral to the modern state, how subsequent attempts to rationalize warfare between states have shaped the international system of states, and, finally, how practices of warfare have been instrumental in creating and maintaining a separation between the West and the rest. This project will result in a monograph entitled Ways of Warmaking, to be submitted to the publisher for review in 2015.
The theoretical part of this project has been completed. I am currently in the process of collecting and analyzing early-modern texts for the historical chapters, and have drafted the first of these, dealing with imaginaries of war as the foundation of the modern state.

For most of the modern period, war has been understood in essentialist terms, as a timeless category of thought and action. Yet arguably, the concept of war has undergone a series of significant changes from the sixteenth century to the present, and many of these changes have had a profound impact on the sociopolitical world. Hence, in this project, I will explore how changing conceptualizations of war have conditioned the ways in which war has been conducted from the early modern period to the present.

As I shall suggest, making historical sense of this connection is necessary in order to understand how practices of warfare have shaped the identities of agents and the boundaries separating them. Doing this, I shall focus on how different conceptions of war have been integral to the modern state, how subsequent attempts to rationalize warfare between states have shaped the international system of states, and, finally, how practices of warfare have been instrumental in creating and maintaining a separation between the West and the rest.

This project will result in a monograph entitled Ways of Warmaking, to be submitted to the publisher for review in 2015.The theoretical part of this project has been completed. I am currently in the process of collecting and analyzing early-modern texts for the historical chapters, and have drafted the first of these, dealing with imaginaries of war as the foundation of the modern state.

Selected bibliography

Sovereignty as Symbolic Form (Abingdon: Routledge, 2014) (in press).

’Sovereignty and the Personality of the State’, in Peter Stirk (ed.) The Concept of the State in International Relations (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2014). (in press).

‘Can Sovereignty be Divided?’, in Mathias Mossberg & Mark Levine (eds.) One Land – Two States? (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2014), pp. 29-43. (in press).

‘Functional Differentiation and Legitimate Authority’, in Rodney Bruce Hall (ed.), Reducing Armed Violence with NGO Governance (Abingdon: Routledge, 2013), pp. 41-57.

‘Three Concepts of Recognition’, International Theory, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2013, pp. 107-129.

’Ways of Warmaking’, in Hans Ruin & Andrus Ers (eds.) Rethinking Time. Essays on Historical Consciousness, Memory, and Representation, Södertörn Philosophical Studies 10, 2011, pp. 167-178.

‘On the Indivisibility of Sovereignty’, Republics of Letters. A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2011, pp. 85-94.

‘What is Wrong with the World?’, Contemporary Political Theory, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2011, pp. 290-293.

’Beyond Democratic Legitimacy: Global Governance and the Promotion of Liberty’, in Christer Jönsson & Jonas Tallberg (eds.) Transnational Actors in Global Governance (Houndsmills: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), pp. 218-236.

’Double Binds: Sovereignty and the Just War Tradition’, in Hent Kalmo & Quentin Skinner (eds.) Sovereignty in Fragments. The Past, Present and Future of a Contested Concept, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp. 81-95.

Globality, Democracy, and Civil Society (edited with Terrell Carver) (London: Routledge, 2010).

’The Social Construction of Globality’, International Political Sociology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 2010, pp. 219-235.

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