Histcon.se Time, Memory and Representation Tid, Minne, Representation

A Multidisciplinary Program on Transformations in Historical Consciousness

Ett mångdisciplinärt forskningsprogram om historiemedvetandets förvandlingar

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Stefan Helgesson: "The Writing of Colonial Time"

Published on 5 March, 2013

Seminar at the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Monday April 8.

Stefan Helgesson, participating scholar of TMR and member of the program committee, visits the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign with the seminar "The Writing of Colonial Time".

Author's Roundtable: "The Writing of Colonial Time"
Stefan Helgesson (Stockholm University)
Respondents: Dara Goldman (Spanish, Italian & Portuguese, Latino/Latina Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, Director of Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies), Ken Salo (Urban & Regional Planning), Matthew Nelson (Comparative & World Literature)
The works of Euclides da Cunha (1866-1909, Brazil), Olive Schreiner (1855-1920, South Africa) and Thomas Mofolo (1877-1948, South Africa) all deal with questions of time and historical change under conditions of colonial conflict. While temporality has long been a key concern in the humanities, not least in postcolonial studies, the implications of the theoretical debates point in two different directions. On the one hand, notions of multiple temporalities, alternative modernities or entangled durées in the postcolony are presented as advances on earlier, hegemonic conceptions of modernity. Other theorists, however, argue just as forcefully that positing temporal difference is an act of epistemic violence that serves to mask the interests of power. While the chapter presented at this roundtable begins by assessing some attempts to solve this aporia – notably the well known interventions of Johannes Fabian and Dipesh Chakrabarty – it will ultimately argue that a theorization of literary temporality by way of Da Cunha's, Schreiner's and Mofolo's narratives will provide a more enabling and less binaristic account of the problem.
Co-Organized by the Unit for Criticism & Interpretive Theory and the Trowbridge Office on American Literature, Culture, and Society

Information from the organizors:

Monday, April 8, 8pm, Levis Faculty Center, Second Floor

Author's Roundtable: "The Writing of Colonial Time"

Stefan Helgesson (Stockholm University)

Respondents: Dara Goldman (Spanish, Italian & Portuguese, Latino/Latina Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, Director of Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies), Ken Salo (Urban & Regional Planning), Matthew Nelson (Comparative & World Literature)

The works of Euclides da Cunha (1866-1909, Brazil), Olive Schreiner (1855-1920, South Africa) and Thomas Mofolo (1877-1948, South Africa) all deal with questions of time and historical change under conditions of colonial conflict. While temporality has long been a key concern in the humanities, not least in postcolonial studies, the implications of the theoretical debates point in two different directions.

On the one hand, notions of multiple temporalities, alternative modernities or entangled durées in the postcolony are presented as advances on earlier, hegemonic conceptions of modernity. Other theorists, however, argue just as forcefully that positing temporal difference is an act of epistemic violence that serves to mask the interests of power.

While the chapter presented at this roundtable begins by assessing some attempts to solve this aporia – notably the well known interventions of Johannes Fabian and Dipesh Chakrabarty – it will ultimately argue that a theorization of literary temporality by way of Da Cunha's, Schreiner's and Mofolo's narratives will provide a more enabling and less binaristic account of the problem.

Co-Organized by the Unit for Criticism & Interpretive Theory and the Trowbridge Office on American Literature, Culture, and Society

More information about the seminar available here.

Produced by MarsApril